Archive for May, 2009

Gambling Granny Fined

Sunday, May 31st, 2009

I’ve heard of stories where people run gambling dens openly at funerals, by offering the mourning some ‘ang pow’ to help with funeral expenses, in return for being allowed to open a few tables at the funeral. People normally gamble in full view of the public at funerals anyway, and surely the police wouldn’t raid a funeral?! (And risk being haunted you know?)

Maybe not.

GAMBLING GRANNY FINED

A 69-year-old grandmother, Koh Moi Moi, was fined $5,000 yesterday by district court for gaming in a public place.

At 4.15am on April 22, police officers noticed people going in and out of a makeshift enclosed area beside a Chinese funeral wake at the void deck of Blk 1, Bedok South Avenue 1.

They raided the make-shift area which was covered with yellow canvas, and found Koh around a table with 11 other people playing a game called Si Ki Phuay – a game of chance using chips and money as stakes.

Cash amounting to $517 along with other items like cigarettes, dice and red packets were seized.

Koh, who was unrepresented, pleaded for a light sentence. She said she needed to take care of her granddaughter as both the child’s parents are working.

Ong Dai Lin

(via TodayOnline)

The online world is going to face armageddon!

Friday, May 22nd, 2009

Gmail current offers over 7GB of online space for your emails, and counting. This is several times the 2GB space offered just a few years back. I thought it weird that Google would want to encourage this kind of behavior from it’s users. “You’ll never need to delete another message” was their mantra.

Lots of Space - Gmail

In Singapore, we do our spring cleaning at least once a year, to get ready for Chinese New Year. In just one year, stuff accumulates, and there’s always something to get rid of. Imagine the clutter and junk that has accumulated over the years on Google servers – and no one is planning to spring clean. Maybe Google will one day announce that all mails beyond 5 years will be archived and/or deleted from its servers in their efforts to go green and save the planet.

In a way, online behavior influences offline behavior, and vice-versa. People are charging stuff on their credit cards they can’t afford, allowing debt to snowball till they can’t pay off, taking loans they shouldn’t be taking, having their homes taken from them to seek some kind of balance. Somehow, control is no longer there.

We have to be careful that our world doesn’t one day become like the world of Wall-E!

Wall-E

Internets Energy Appetite a Threat
by Bobbie Johnson

SAN FRANCISCO – The Internet?s increasing appetite for electricity poses a major threat to companies such as Google, according to scientists and industry executives.

Leading figures have told The Guardian that many Internet companies are struggling to manage the costs of delivering billions of web pages, videos and files online – in a “perfect storm” that could even threaten the future of the Internet itself.

“In an energy-constrained world, we cannot continue to grow the footprint of the Internet … we need to rein in the energy consumption,” said Mr Subodh Bapat, vice-president at Sun Microsystems, one of the world?s largest manufacturers of web servers.

Mr Bapat said the network of web servers and data centres that store online information is becoming more expensive, while profits come under pressure as a result of the recession.

“We need more data centres, we need more servers. Each server burns more watts than the previous generation and each watt costs more,” he said. “If you compound all of these trends, you have the perfect storm.”

With more than 1.5 billion people online around the world, scientists estimate that the energy footprint of the Internet is growing by more than 10 per cent each year. This leaves many Internet firms caught in a bind: Energy costs are escalating because of their growing popularity, while their advertising revenues come under pressure from the recession.

One site under particular scrutiny is YouTube – now the world?s third-biggest website, but one that requires a heavy subsidy from Google, its owner. A recent analysis by Credit Suisse suggested it could lose as much as £317 million ($698 million) this year, as it succumbs to the high cost of delivering power-intensive videos over the Web.

And while the demand for electricity is a primary concern, a secondary result of the explosion of Internet use is that the computer industry?s carbon debt is increasing drastically.

However, tracking the growth of the Web?s energy use is difficult, since internal company estimates of power consumption are rarely made public.

One study by energy analyst Rich Brown, commissioned by the United States environmental protection agency, suggested that US data centres used 61 billion kilowatt hours of energy in 2006. That is enough to supply the whole of the United Kingdom for two months.

Mr Brown said that despite efforts to achieve greater efficiency, Internet use is growing at such a rate that it is outstripping technical improvements – meaning that American data centres could account for as much as80 billion kWh this year.

Among the problems that could result from the Internet?s voracious hunger for electricity are website failures and communications disruption costing millions in lost business every hour – as well as power cuts and brownouts at plants which supply data centres with electricity.

To combat this, initiatives are taking place across the industry to cope with the problem, including new designs for data centres, innovative cooling methods and more investment in renewable energy.

Google was among the first Internet firms to take action to reduce its footprint by developing its own data centres – but even though it pumped nearly US$2.3 billion ($3.4 billion) into projects last year, its vice-president of operations Urs Hölzle said the firm was struggling to contain energy costs.

“You have exponential growth in demand from users, and many of these services are free so you don?t have exponential growth of revenue to go with it,” he said.

THE GUARDIAN